SuperMicMac

2001 Opus Prize: Musical Event of the Year

A collaboration with the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, SuperMicMac is a unique retrospective on the part women played in the evolution of 20th century Canadian creative music.

Presented from October 25 to November 12, 2000, this major event pays tribute to the perseverance and imagination of innovative Canadian female musicians. SuperMicMac is a celebration that helps us remember the hardheaded women who made, and keep on making, new contemporary, electroacoustic and “actuelle” music.

SuperMicMac consists of 13 concerts, 1 music theatre, 1 commented recital, 2 lectures, 1 round table, 1 exhibition, 4 cocktails, with over a hundred artists from all over Canada. From Halifax to Vancouver, these female virtuosos, magnificent composers, crafty inventors, inspired improvisers, experienced orchestra conductors and passionate musicologists will bring life to the creative music of yesterday and today.

  • Wednesday, October 25 – Sunday, November 12, 2000

Portraits des pionnières d’hier à aujourd’hui

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Exhibition. Does music created by women have a distinctive sound? A specific philosophy? A special color? Have you always wanted to know how women composers express themselves? Answers to questions like these will be found amongst the archival documents, photographs and scores that have been carefully selected by Mireille Gagné, a musicologist and the director of the Centre de musique canadienne au Québec. Along with Marie-Thérèse Lefebvre’s November 1st lecture entitled La face cachée de l’histoire des femmes dans le milieu musical montréalais, this exhibition will present some of the most prominent figures of the twentieth century. A most worthwhile detour to the Corridor des pas perdus of Place des Arts will allow you to discover the extraordinary path traveled by these inspired, inspiring and adventurous women.

Corridor des pas perdus – Place des Arts
175, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
  • Wednesday, October 25, 2000
    8:00 pm
  • Thursday, October 26, 2000
    8:00 pm

Hommage à La Bolduc

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

From 1927 to 1941 Mary Travers, known as La Bolduc, had a very successful career as a “popular” singer. An eccentric who was shunned by the musical intelligentsia, she nevertheless wrote the music and the lyrics to about a hundred songs, and her immense success gave new life to la turlutte (a way of singing with the tongue keeping rhythm) and to folk music. • Music actuelle has always had a connection to popular, traditional and festive music, so it is not surprising that La Bolduc has been one of its sources of inspiration. In homage to her, Diane Labrosse has chosen some of her works and entrusted them to innovative women composers who are active in fields as varied as electroacoustic music, contemporary music, music actuelle, improvised music and jazz. Their arrangements promise an imaginative deluge that will echo La Bolduc’s creative spirit, a spirit that made her a true supermama of her time.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts

Programme

  • voice, flute (alto saxophone, objects), bass clarinet (tenor saxophone), violin, viola, double bass, electric guitar, accordion (sampler), piano, percussion and drum kit
    Commission: Productions SuperMusique
  • Friday, October 27, 2000
    8:00 pm

Cris et chants

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

What could be more basic and personal than one’s breathing and one’s voice? • In the first part, three sopranos explore, first in solo, the spirit of contemporary vocal art. From the operatic universe of Fides Krucker, through the technological approach of Kathy Kennedy, to the improvisation and exploratory compositions of DB Boyko, the voice emerges in its many creative and distinct ways. In the finale, the three artists improvise in a vocal trio that will combine very unique styles. • Katajjait, the throat-singing of Nunavik, is a genre of women’s music that is still being handed down from generation to generation. Performance and competition in equal measure, these songs (which sound somewhat like panting) only end when the players burst out laughing and have to stop. The SuperMicMac will present the young Evie Tullaugaq Mark and Sarah Beaulne, who learned their craft from the renowned Lydia Audlaluk and Mary Sivuarapik.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Saturday, October 28, 2000
    8:00 pm

VIEW

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Improvisation has existed since the beginnings of music. It is a method of composing that is anchored in the moment and whose outcome is determined both by the interplay between the instrumentalists and by their ability to listen to, to hear, one another. VIEW raises this to an art of writing that succeeds in combining forms and producing flowing musical conversations. • The ensemble formed in 1997 out of Women in View, a music improvisation series presented at the Western Front in Vancouver — a city that, along with Montréal and Toronto, is undoubtedly one of the most vibrant for musical experimentation. These musicians work with other ensembles as well and are very active in the world of jazz and contemporary music. Following their acclaimed appearance at the 1997 Montréal International Jazz Festival, they are back, together once again, in Montréal.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Sunday, October 29, 2000
    2:00 pm

ECM•relève: ContemporElles

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

The Ensemble contemporain de Montréal has been making an unceasing contribution to the encouragement and promotion of the young creators of contemporary music ever since it was founded by Véronique Lacroix in 1987. The ECM•relève–ContemporElles concert continues this process through its intelligent presentation of promising musicians who are on the rise because of either their compositions or their abilities as performers. On the program are works written during the last five years, and the concert will offer a very good insight into the generation of women composers who are in their 30s, a colorful generation that is finding its own way to renew the language of written music even as it continues in the “great” classical music tradition. This concert will also provide an opportunity to hear the ondes Martenot played by Geneviève Grenier and Estelle Lemire in a work Lemire created.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Monday, October 30, 2000
    5:00 pm

Les innovatrices et le jazz

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Lecture. In the 1970s women began to make a real mark on the male world of jazz. Through this gradual process emerged musicians whose innovations have now found a place in the great history of world jazz. Who are Renee Rosnes, Jane Bunnett, Lorraine Desmarais, Ingrid Jensen and Dinah Vero? What paths did they follow, and what influence did they have? The speaker, Sonia Pâquet, is an expert on Canadian jazz, as well as a saxophonist, and she will relate the fascinating epic story of Canadian jazzwomen. We invite you to discover one of the most captivating aspects of our musical culture through the story of the careers and experiences of these women.

Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur
100, rue Sherbrooke Est
métro Sherbrooke + autobus 24 Ouest / métro Saint-Laurent + autobus 55 Nord
  • Monday, October 30, 2000
    8:00 pm

Eva Gauthier

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Eva Gauthier (1885-1958) was one of the prominent figures of the first half of the 20th century and certainly one of the most flamboyant and innovative singers of her time. A great lover of the music of Poulenc, Milhaud, Debussy, Stravinsky and Ravel, she was also the first woman to introduce jazz and oriental music to America. Legend has it that she played a role in the birth of George Gershwin’s career. With commentary by well-known music lover Edgar Fruitier and mezzo-soprano Christine Lemelin, this recital will introduce and allow us to share the songs that the woman who was called “the high priestess of modern lyric art” loved best. • Christine Lemelin, who is also a concert soloist and actor, first gained notice in opera, especially for her interpretation of Carmen in Peter Brook’s La tragédie de Carmen. The legendary producer and director had a strong influence on her, and as a result of the experience she brings a strong dramatic sense to her interpretations.

Maison de la culture Frontenac
2550, rue Ontario
métro Frontenac
  • Tuesday, October 31, 2000
    5:00 pm

Les sorcières font du bruit

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Roundtable. What makes a form innovative? What does it mean to make innovative music today? • Four musicians from different fields (contemporary music, musique actuelle, electroacoustics, and radio art), all of whom are active in the Montréal music scene, will give their point of view on questions that are more relevant than ever. The debate promises to be a lively one, as these versatile and committed women know how to speak out!

Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur
100, rue Sherbrooke Est
métro Sherbrooke + autobus 24 Ouest / métro Saint-Laurent + autobus 55 Nord
  • Tuesday, October 31, 2000
    8:00 pm

carte blanche 1

Rien à voir (8)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM), Réseaux des arts médiatiques.

Electroacoustic music has existed since the end of the 1940s, and it offers the inquiring listener the promise of an extraordinary sound adventure. In these two concerts an orchestra of sixteen loudspeakers endows the music with a strong spatial dimension that will create an astonishing “cinema of the ear” in which sound rules. • Réseaux, a concert organization devoted to acousmatic music, has promoted the Rien à voir concept, in which a number of electroacoustic musicians are by turns given carte blanche to conceive an evening. The SuperMicMac gives this carte blanche to composer Chantale Laplante. In order to survey electroacoustic creation in Canada she had opted for a program that is varied and open to esthetics that range both from sound ecology to electronica and from a concrete approach to manipulations that are more usually electronic in nature. From the pioneers through to the coming generation, these two evenings will present concerts that offer a panorama of the different tendencies that guide electroacoustic music.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts

Programme

  • Wednesday, November 1, 2000
    5:00 pm

La face cachée de l’histoire des femmes dans le milieu musical montréalais

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Lecture. Marie-Thérèse Lefebvre is a professor of musicology at the Faculty of Music of the Université de Montréal and has published a number of works and numerous articles. She is also very active in the Montréal music scene. She is an authority on the subject of women and music and will present to us women musicians, composers, instrumentalists, conductors, teachers, presenters and administrators who paved the way for the women of today. This lecture promises to provide a fascinating look at a page from the history of music that is too often skipped over.

Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur
100, rue Sherbrooke Est
métro Sherbrooke + autobus 24 Ouest / métro Saint-Laurent + autobus 55 Nord
  • Wednesday, November 1, 2000
    8:00 pm

carte blanche 2

Rien à voir (8)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM), Réseaux des arts médiatiques.

Electroacoustic music has existed since the end of the 1940s, and it offers the inquiring listener the promise of an extraordinary sound adventure. In these two concerts an orchestra of sixteen loudspeakers endows the music with a strong spatial dimension that will create an astonishing “cinema of the ear” in which sound rules. • Réseaux, a concert organization devoted to acousmatic music, has promoted the Rien à voir concept, in which a number of electroacoustic musicians are by turns given carte blanche to conceive an evening. The SuperMicMac gives this carte blanche to composer Chantale Laplante. In order to survey electroacoustic creation in Canada she had opted for a program that is varied and open to esthetics that range both from sound ecology to electronica and from a concrete approach to manipulations that are more usually electronic in nature. From the pioneers through to the coming generation, these two evenings will present concerts that offer a panorama of the different tendencies that guide electroacoustic music.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts

Programme

  • Thursday, November 2, 2000
    5:00 pm

Tourne-disques et Djettes (1/4)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

There are, happily, more and more women DJs in Montréal. Whether they are creating background music through the skillful mixing of different music, or creating totally new pieces, the DJettes are artists of the present. In tune both with their public and with the world of music, these exciting women are at the heart of new movements and on the cutting edge of new trends. • You will have the opportunity to discover and hear them in action at Laïka (the invitation is for cocktail time, please), one of the few venues in Montréal where they can be heard. You will be able to appreciate the full potential of an impressive performance style that demands great memory, exceptional dexterity and a powerful sense of rhythm.

Laïka
4040, boulevard Saint-Laurent (angle Duluth Ouest)
métro Saint-Laurent
  • Thursday, November 2, 2000
    8:00 pm

Lorraine Vaillancourt: Chef de file (1/2)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

This year the OSM is establishing a contemporary music series entitled L’OSM au présent, and it is hardly surprising that the orchestra would look to Lorraine Vaillancourt’s talent and experience as a conductor to inaugurate the event. The program will focus on both the composers of today and their predecessors. • The concert will be preceded at 6:15 PM by a round table discussion entitled “Jouer, diriger, composer la musique d’aujourd’hui” (Playing, directing and composing today’s music). The participants will be Jacques Drouin, pianist, José Evangelista, composer, and Véronique Lacroix, conductor.

Théâtre Maisonneuve – Place des Arts
175, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Friday, November 3, 2000
    5:00 pm

Tourne-disques et Djettes (2/4)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

There are, happily, more and more women DJs in Montréal. Whether they are creating background music through the skillful mixing of different music, or creating totally new pieces, the DJettes are artists of the present. In tune both with their public and with the world of music, these exciting women are at the heart of new movements and on the cutting edge of new trends. • You will have the opportunity to discover and hear them in action at Laïka (the invitation is for cocktail time, please), one of the few venues in Montréal where they can be heard. You will be able to appreciate the full potential of an impressive performance style that demands great memory, exceptional dexterity and a powerful sense of rhythm.

Laïka
4040, boulevard Saint-Laurent (angle Duluth Ouest)
métro Saint-Laurent
  • Friday, November 3, 2000
    8:00 pm

Des solistes exceptionnelles

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Exceptional, because they go beyond the limits of simple interpretation, and in so doing create new works. • vivie’ vinçent is mad about the harpsichord, and the ultimate baroque instrument is made modern under the hands of this composer-performer. Imbued with a passion for re-composing existing works, vivie’ vinçent transforms them through electronic manipulation and other sound-transformation techniques. • Katherine Duncanson is a solo vocalist as well as a prolific multidisciplinary artist. In this work she starts from a poem by Robert Wilson and explores language to the point where finally its sounds leave us with no more than a primitive impression. • Rivka Golani, who impresses both because of her presence and her dazzling technique, is one of the greatest contemporary violists and an inspiration to performers and composers alike. Her contribution to the advancement of viola technique makes her place in history certain. In this concert Golani will delve into her repertoire to present three strong pieces written by Lauber, Southam and Turner — women composers whose very different approaches complement each other perfectly.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Saturday, November 4, 2000
    8:00 pm

Les grandes exploratrices

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

It takes character to go beyond conventional boundaries, and these musicians have it in great quantity. These highly original virtuoso and innovative inventors set off into uncharted territory. • Joane Hétu’s mouth and saxophone are capable of incredible things. The sounds that bubble out of her instrument, her singing and her breathing, given form here by Bernard Grenon, transport us into a world that is gratifyingly tribal and essential. • Magali Babin is fascinated by contact microphones for guitars and by the amplification of the sounds that can be made with metal. She explores the microcosm of metallic objects that she makes vibrate, and by doing so creates music that is both minimalist yet immense. • The trio of Bourne, van Berlo and Young was formed out of a workshop with the grande dame of American new music, Pauline Oliveros. With playing that strips form down to its essential qualities, this trio presents minimalist, microtonal music that is superbly delicate and impressionistic. Gayle Young will play the amaranth, a sort of 24-string koto she invented that has a profound and mysterious sound.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Sunday, November 5, 2000
    2:00 pm

Lorraine Vaillancourt: Chef de file (2/2)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Workshop-concert. Lorraine Vaillancourt is a bundle of energy who has been working as a pianist, conductor and teacher since the beginning of the 1970s. Her commitment, ability and determination have thoroughly energized and enriched the contemporary music scene. The founder and director of a multitude of groups and organizations, Lorraine Vaillancourt is one of the dominant figures in Canadian music. • In this concert she will be presenting five highly regarded woman composers who are renowned for the intelligence and the maturity of their writing. • Founded in 1970 by Serge Garant and relaunched in 1974 by Lorraine Vaillancourt, the ATMC is a workshop-course that each year encourages students to create contemporary music works. The ATMC surveys music from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present, allowing composers from Québec and Canada to create original works. • Since Lorraine Vaillancourt founded the NEM in 1989 the ensemble’s reputation has been growing constantly. Dedicated solely to contemporary music, the NEM is acclaimed wherever it performs and is considered to be one of the finest contemporary music groups in existence.

Salle Beverley Webster Rolph – Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal
185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
métro Place-des-Arts
  • Tuesday, November 7, 2000
    8:00 pm

Installations, ordinateurs et objets

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

Music can be more than just a matter of hearing. Touch, manipulation and installation are all elements that can change the way we listen and reveal new meaning. • Diane Landry shakes up perspective and forces us to perceive familiar objects in a different way. This visual artist creates fleeting three-dimensional and sound tableaux that form and disappear in time and space. • Sarah Peebles creates and improvises in real time with the aid of a computer. To pulverize synthetic sounds and sample pre-recorded music, she employs a full range of computer paraphernalia: mouse, keyboard, laptop and MIDI synthesizer. • Sylvie Chenard and Hélène Boissinot will offer a committed performance inspired by four rebel-women of the past. By marrying poetry, musical experimentation and the manipulation of objects, these two artists will invent strange scenes to a background of sound blending.

Maison de la culture du Plateau-Mont-Royal
465, avenue du Mont-Royal Est
métro Mont-Royal
  • Wednesday, November 8, 2000
    8:00 pm

Quatuor Claudel: Femmes d’ici et d’ailleurs

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

You need a lot of adjectives to describe a string quartet such as the Claudel properly. The lyricism is inspired, the performances are of remarkable quality, the cohesion exceptional and the synchronization infallible. • Formed in 1989 by the superb violinists Élaine Marcil and Marie-Josée Arpin, this quartet is known for its uncommon intensity and integrity. With a program that includes the only string quartet written by Micheline Coulombe Saint-Marcoux, this concert will present the work of non-Canadian composers, and this exception will provide us with a rare opportunity to listen to the music of Sophia Goubaïdoulina and Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. These are demanding works for virtuoso instrumentalists only.

Salle Pierre-Mercure – Centre Pierre-Péladeau
300, boulevard de Maisonneuve Est
métro Berri-UQAM
  • Thursday, November 9, 2000
    5:00 pm

Tourne-disques et Djettes (3/4)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

There are, happily, more and more women DJs in Montréal. Whether they are creating background music through the skillful mixing of different music, or creating totally new pieces, the DJettes are artists of the present. In tune both with their public and with the world of music, these exciting women are at the heart of new movements and on the cutting edge of new trends. • You will have the opportunity to discover and hear them in action at Laïka (the invitation is for cocktail time, please), one of the few venues in Montréal where they can be heard. You will be able to appreciate the full potential of an impressive performance style that demands great memory, exceptional dexterity and a powerful sense of rhythm.

Laïka
4040, boulevard Saint-Laurent (angle Duluth Ouest)
métro Saint-Laurent
  • Thursday, November 9, 2000
    8:00 pm
  • Friday, November 10, 2000
    8:00 pm
  • Saturday, November 11, 2000
    8:00 pm
  • Sunday, November 12, 2000
    8:00 pm

Talk Show / Han n 17

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM), Société de musique contemporaine du Québec (SMCQ).

Composer and librettist Marie Pelletier possesses demonic energy. She has more than sixty works to her credit, one-third of which fall into the category of musical theater. • In this new work the audience will take part in a talk show where two of the most powerful archetypes of the seducer-figure, Don Juan and Carmen, meet and clash. Six musicians, a conductor and four singers will be on stage. With its floating, dream-like structure, and to finely written music, this theater-within-theater questions these great authorities and asks “Why are we the way we are?” Marie Pelletier has some ironic answers for us.

La Chapelle – scènes contemporaines
3700, rue Saint-Dominique
métro Sherbrooke + autobus 144 / métro Saint-Laurent + autobus 55 Nord
  • Friday, November 10, 2000
    5:00 pm

Tourne-disques et Djettes (4/4)

Presented by Productions SuperMusique (PSM).

There are, happily, more and more women DJs in Montréal. Whether they are creating background music through the skillful mixing of different music, or creating totally new pieces, the DJettes are artists of the present. In tune both with their public and with the world of music, these exciting women are at the heart of new movements and on the cutting edge of new trends. • You will have the opportunity to discover and hear them in action at Laïka (the invitation is for cocktail time, please), one of the few venues in Montréal where they can be heard. You will be able to appreciate the full potential of an impressive performance style that demands great memory, exceptional dexterity and a powerful sense of rhythm.

Laïka
4040, boulevard Saint-Laurent (angle Duluth Ouest)
métro Saint-Laurent

Participants

In the press

Super Sisters

Krista, Montreal Mirror, November 23, 2000

How does that saying go — “Necessity is the mother of invention-? It’s apparently the driving force behind the SuperMicMac/SuperMémé festival currently taking place at the Musee d’Art Contemporain, Centre Pierre Péladeau, Théâtre La Chapelle and Laïka, among other spots.

Super-who you ask? What is this festival all about? Well, according to Marie Marais, press attaché for the festival. “The main goal behind the SuperMicMac program is to draw awareness to increasing number of highly talented women working within the realm of «musique actuelle» and «musique concrète.” Ergo the «SuperMémé» title, which in French means superwoman.

«Women working in this field have been passed over and misrepresented for far der’ too long» continues Marais. Many of the pionners in this field have been women."

The superwomen behind the festival are Joane Hetu, Diane Labrosse and Daniel Palardy Roger. The three local musicians/composers of musique actuelle and improvisation have been working at it for some 20 years. Drawing inspiration from early pioneers of the genre like Fred Frith and John Cage, Palardy Roger was turned on to the idea of improvisational composition (something of an oxymoron) back in 1979 and got involved with a collective of women called Wonderbras.

“It was the liberty and the closeness to creation that intrigued me," she says of her decision to become a composer. «I was able to do what I wanted with the materials and instruments — there was no recipe to follow. This is the basis of improvised music."

While Palardy Roger performs almost completely improvisational pieces, she maintains that there is a basic structure in all improvised music. “I interchange parts of each composition when I play it and I encourage the other musicians to improvise as well" she explains.

The SuperMicMac festival is the first of its kind and took the three organizers over two years to put together. It aims to “honour innovative women in Canadian music" and showcase the contribution Canadian women have made and are making to the advancement of contemporary music." Think of it as one big purge for women on the edge of a nervous breakdown — women from across the country gathered together to make lots and lots and lots of noise In the name of art.

Don Juan rencontre Carmen

Solange Lévesque, Le Devoir, November 9, 2000

Sur les 90 musiciens qui participent au SuperMicMac, on truve 76 compositrices contemporaines dont la plupart sont également interprètes. Un des mérites de ce creuset musical est de faire travailler ensemble des artistes qui ne se connaissaient pas. «Cette rencontre est touchante et révélatrice, remarque Marie Pelletier. Elle donne une visibilité à plusieurs créatrices venant de milieux musicaux fort différents, dont on ignore trop souvent l’existence.» France Castel juge qu’«il est important que les femmes éprouvent une solidarité et qu’elles aient la permission de s’exprimer SuperMicMac va justement à l’encontre des tabous qui isolent les différents genres artistiques».

Son œuvre met en présence deux figures emblématiques de la séduction: Carmen et Don Juan. L’auteur-compositrice était intriguée par ces deux personnages: pourquoi sont-ils si peu soucieux de la souffrance des autres et des conséquences de leurs actes? Elle a senti le besoin de retourner à leurs créateurs respectifs (Prosper Mémée et Tirso de Molina) pour tenter de saisir des éléments occultés susceptibles de tout expliquer. «Finalement, ce sont les écrits de la pschanalyste Alice Miller qui ont confirmé mon impressiont: le donjuanisme est une forme de réaction à une expérience vécue pendant la petite enfance. Cette découverte a changé le sens de la rencontre des deux séducteurs, qui est devenue peu à peu un plaidoyerpourl’enfant.»

Marie Pelletier a retenu la forme du talk-show: «C’est une formule très actuelle et un joli prétexte pour les mettre en présence. D’ailleurs, où ces deux-là auraient-ils pu se rencontrer, sinon là? La situation les confronte à leur désir de sauver les apparences et les met aux prises avec leur image.» France Castel explique que «le talk-show est une situation dangereuse où tout le monde prend des risques; de ce fait, elle permet beaucoup de théâtralité. L’animateur rêvait de recevoir Don Juan: celui-ci s’amène, et voilà qu’arrive aussi Carmen». L’auteur-compositeur a choisi une situation qui installe le théâtre dans le théâtre; par sa simple présence, le public est amené à jouer… Ie public. «Mais cela demeure du théâtre, avec des musiciens et un chef sur scène, ce qui est trés différent de la comédie musicale et de l’opéra», précise France Castel, qui met à profit la présence du chef Walter Boudreau dans sa mise en scène.

Pour donner un caractère réel aux deux monstres sacrés et pour les rendre actuels, Marie Pelletier a imaginé Don Juan en homme d’affaires et Carmen en écrivaine féministe. Avec son expérience de l’interprétation, France Castel a développé les personnages, en étayant leur histoire intime: «Il a les choses que l’interprète joue; il y en a d’autres qu’il porte en soi et ne joue pas: elles sont aussi importantes les unes que les autres, affirme-t-elle.

Eclectic Love

Sara Cornett, The McGill Tribune, November 7, 2000

SuperMicMac is a superb festival focusing on music and women

If you are one of the unenlightened, it is time for you to find out: SuperMicMac is a three-week festival showcasing new, contemporary, electroacoustic and experimental music composed and performed by women across Canada. One of the festival’s goals is to make known those artists who remain in the shadows.

The opening show by Ensemble SuperMusique featured songs by the folksinger Mary Travers (a.k.a. La Bolduc). I had the privilege of attending a repent performance the following night. La Bolduc was a mother of 12, who lived during the Depression in the 1930s. She learned to play the violin, harmonica and guimbarde and traveled around Quebec, performing her music (which amounts to approx. 85 songs).

Historically, Travers’ music has been an inspiration to Quebeckers. Despite a povertymarked background, La Bolduc brought lovable, sometimes goofy lyrics and uplifting melodies to the people in times of hardship. I found the theme appropriate as an introduction to this festival.

With the theme of a musical mosaic of femininity in my mind, I was surprised when I saw 7 men among the members of the 11 person-ensemble on stage. “Isn’t this supposed to be all about women?" I thought to myself, but my puzzled state eventually became one of fascination and sheer delight. Later, I realized the songs were arranged by women composers and musicians.

The best thing about the show was that it was wonderfully unconventional. Accustomed to classical concerts, I anticipatod musicians in formal attire who would follow the conductor’s direction from a podium, and expectod the audience’s -applause to come at the end of segments. This show broke every one of these moulds. From their casual attire to the audience’s round of applause after every song, the concert was all about the unexpected. The musicians showed their admiration and enjoyment for each other’s talents through smiles and laughter.

With a personal and comical touch the master of ceremonies briefly described each musician, their instruments and their role in the ensemble. The conductor of the Ensemble SuperMusique is referred to as the Chef designé (appointed chief), emphasizing their purposeful break from the conventional. Though the music was rearranged in a dramatic way, the songs still preserved the cultual feel of old Québec folk music.

I never cease to be amazed at the diversity of this world and of its people. This was no exception. Before my eyes, a fifty-year-old woman was groovin’ to the cool sounds she produced on her synthesizer. All the musicians played different instruments and they exploited various sound-producing techniques. In the first song Quitte pour quitte, the drummer used jingle bells as drumsticks, along with dramatic growling. In another song, the singer sang her Iyrics through à harmonica. In Les marigouins, with the saxophone, violin, guitar, accordion and xylophone, they produced the sound of a mosquito invasion.

As the emcee pointed out, quoting La Bolduc, when all is stripped away, one can always fall back on la turluite. The general 3 meaning refers to Song or the act of singing. La Bolduc treats the Song as a gift that no one can take away from you. The last song, called Ça va venir, decouragez-vous pas (It’ll come, don’t let it bring you down), is an expression of hope in the face of despair appreciate this tribute to La Bolduc, for no matter what beliefs you might hold, hope, love and joy reach everyone and she left a musical legacy as testament. Whether everyone understood the 3 performance in this way is doubt- ful, but it was obvious the great | majority enjoyed it.

I encourage all to check out the remaining performances, but hurry because half the festival is over.

MicMac symphonique

Francois Tousignant, Le Devoir, November 4, 2000

Le Super MicMac bat son plein. Cette manifestation consacrée à l’activité des femmes en musique. Dans tout ce genre de manifestation, la présence de Lorraine Vaillancourt est incontournable, elle qui travaille et avec la jeunesse (en tant que professeur à la faculté de musique de l’Université de Montréal) et avec la création (en tant que directrice artistique du Nouvel Ensemble moderne - NEM). L’Atelier de musique contemporaine de sa faculté se joint donc à son NEM chéri pour offrir un concert consacré à des œuvres de cinq compositrices de trois générations successives. On pense parfois que la création musicale au féminin n’a guère de passé, peu de présent, et on s’interroge sur son avenir. Voici donc l’occasion de réfléchir musicalement sur tout cela et de défaire bien des préjugés.

Folles de sons!

Robert Everett-Green, Châtelaine, no. 41,11, November 1, 2000

Super MicMac

La Gazette des femmes, no. 22,4, November 1, 2000

Du 25 octobre au 12 novembre, la maison de production SuperMémé SuperMusique présente le SuperMicmac à Montréal. Le titre de l’événement démontre mieux qu’un long discours l’intention festive et un brin iconoclaste de cette rencontre de musiciennes innovatrices. Lidée vient en fait d’un petit groupe de compositrices et d’improvisatrices désireuses de mettre en lumière le rôle essentiel joué par les Canadiennes dans la musique d’ici depuis le début du siècle, en marge de la musique commerciale. Les organisatrices Joane Hétu, Diane Labrosse et Danielle Pa]ardy Roger, qui jouaient de concert dans le groupe Wondeur Brass, un big band free jazz, puis dans Les Justines au cours des années 80, déploient des trésors d’imagination pour promouvoir les femmes et la musique actuelle. Le SuperMicmac poursuit donc l’idée, en permettant de découvrir les œuvres de compositrices souvent occultées. Une conférence portera ainsi sur l’histoire des femmes dans le milieu musical montréalais, et un programme de quatorze concerts donnera l’occasion à des musiciennes, des compositrices et des chefs d’orchestre de plusieurs provinces canadiennes de se faire davantage connaître. Une pièce de théâtre musicale, une table ronde et une exposition complètent l’événement.

Pomo Or Post-Rock

Maria Simpson, Hour, November 1, 2000

As the crowd nurses their coffee or St-Ambroise Oatmeal Stout, the room darkens and Casa del Popolo fills with music. Or is it noise? The four-piece band shutters and skitters [R an unchartable sequence; my ears strain to understand and appreciate the perfomance. I tum hopelessly to my companions as the electric guitarist pulls out a violin bow and begins sawing at his strings. One companion whispers, “I feel like bugs are crawling all over me."

This trip to Mile End is the final stop in my two-veek journey to get to the heart of the elusive musical genre, musique actuelle. Most people peg this kind of music as improvised. It often uses invented instruments, or traditional ones in innava~ve ways, as well as an electroacoustic element. Howaver, as I attend more and more concerts, I feel less and less certain about what I’m dealing with. Concerts by vivie vincent, Diane Labrosse, Danielle Parlardy Roger, Tim Brady, Sam Shelabi and Alexandre St-Onge prove completely different in approach and sound, yet all claim at least a nod in musique actuelle’s direction. What’s going on?

My journey began at the Supemmicmac Festival, the recently concluded series of concens featuring contemporary female composers and musicians. The organizers, Joanne Hétu, Labrosse and Parlady Roger, founded the Montréal musique actuelle scene 20 years ago. The opening concert of the festival, Hommage à La Bolduc, featured the works of eight composers, using the tunes of French folk singer La Bolduc as a staning point for their individual explorations. A full house avidly followed the 11-piece band’s every move as they humorousiy combined traditional folk singing with electroacoustic effects, wild accordion playing and in one pioce, a growling, writhing percussionist. The performance was thoroughly engaging, musically tight and innovative.

Fast-forward two weeks to Casa del Popolo, where my friend utters his ultimate condemnation. Shelabi and St-Onge, two of the prime movers and shakers of musique actuelle’s younger generation, are attempting to break music down into its more basic elements by stripping away rhythm, melody and structure. When discussing a definition of musique actuelle, St-Onge ventures that it is perhaps “postmodern", but then agrees that the tag does not adequately describe what they are doing. Shelabi concurs. “I think that some people will call anything that sounds weird ‘musique actuelle" he states.

Not feeling- any clearer about the nature of the beast, I later talk to John Braithwaite, who has a music actuelle show on CKUT called Jazz Amuck. “It’s not about a particular genre," he explains.

People come together to make music, and it’s more about a process. You’re seeing the creation of an an form. “All perfommers of experimental music share a desire to push the limits of a form, but the danger these musicians face is losing a fundamental element of performance-communication. While the SuperMicmac drew the audience in, Shelabi anrJ St-Onge, while exploring interesting ideas, kept them at a distance.

For those interested in exploring the mysterious world of musique actuelle for themselves, there are a variety of continuing events produced by groups such as Concerts M, SMCQ, Supermémé and the good folks at Casa del Popolo. Musique actuelle is worthy of attention, but taste, obviously, is personal. As St-Onge reminds, “Your ears should be as open as possible and you should have an open mind.

Festival celebrates women’s avant-garde music

Alexandra Schaffhauser, The Link, October 31, 2000

Expositions of women’s music are few and far between. From Oct 25 to Nov. 12, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal will be hosting SuperMicMac, an event honouring groundbreaking female artists who go above and beyond the traditional study of sound.

Contemporary music, music “actuelle" and new music are oiten labeled as unconventional and innovative musical forms. They are rarely heard on the radio, and rarely performed.

“They are still too often absent from our memories, from too many concert programs, and although many of them play a role of great importance, they often remain in the shadows. The SuperMicMac is a coming together of women musicians and new music that is itself in the shadows. Shadows thrown by better-known forms of music but which themselves were once new" said Danielle Palardy Roger, musician and Artistic Director of Les Productions SuperMémé-Supermusique, the company in charge of the event.

Along with Roger, PSM, created in 1979, is directed by two other musicians, Joane Hétu and Diane Labrosse. PSM’s objective is to promote the involvement of women in contemporary music and provide them with as much exposure as possible. SuperMicMac is a celeUration of the millennium, paying tribute to the art of the 20th century and the artistic exploration about to come in the 21 st century.

Along with Roger, PSM, created in 1979, is directed by two other musicians, Joane Hétu and Diane Labrosse. PSM’s objective is . to promote the involvement of women in contemporary music and provide them with as much exposure as possible. SuperMicMac is a celeUration of the millennium, paying tribute to the art of the 20th century and the artistic exploration about to come in the 21 st century.

SuperMicMac consists of a series of events including 13 concerts, two lectures, one round table discussion, one musical, one exhibition and four cocktail performances. The event showcases the works of more than 100 women musicians, composers, conductors and musicologists.

Music “actuelle,’ contemporary music and new music are difficult terms to coin because they cover a wide range of sounds and styles. Often, the vocalist chooses a specific sound or word and repest it in different pitches, forming a melody and rhythm. When two or more singers are on stage, the effect is offen a comprehensive study of vocal range with intentionally chaotic harmony, operatic wails and conflicting melody and rhythm—creating a fused wall of sonorous contusion and tension.According to Roger, it is «music constantly transformed by bow strokes and drumbeats.-by eraption from synthesizers, samplers and computers, twelvetone micro tonal and serial music…improvised, orchestrated, arranged…constructed, deconstructod and reconstructed music Music in constant metamorphosis".

Composer, jouer et chanter au féminin

Alain Bénard, Le Journal de Montréal, October 28, 2000

Après sa première exploration du monde vocal contemporain le week end dernier, le Supermicmac se poursuit cette semaine avec plusieurs autres activités et concerts autour de la musique actuelle et improvisée au féminin.

Après le concert du Vancouver Improvising Ensemble of Women de ce soir c’est sous le thème de la relève avec ContemporElles que se poursuivra demain au Musée d’art contemporain cette manifestation hors du commun, Véronique Lacroix et l’Ensemble contemporain de Montréal y traçant un tableau des nouvelles tendances compositionnelles issues de la relève portant notamment les noms des Suzanne Hébert Tremblay, Estelle Lemire et Ana Sokolović.

Directrice musicale du Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Lorraine Vaillancourt fera également partie de ce Supermicmac lors de deux événements d’importance. Dans le cadre de la nouvelle série de musique contemporaine de l’Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, la réputée chef d’orchestre québécoise dirigera le prestigieux ensemble montréalais dans un répertoire pour lequel elle est reconnue sur le plan international. Pour l’occasion, Lorraine Vaillancourt a choisi d’inaugurer la série OSM au présent par l’exécution d’œuvres de Michel Longtin, Philippe Boesmans, Michael Osterle et de George Benjamin. Soulignons que la soliste de cette soirée sera la soprano Louise Marcotte (Dialogues de carmélites, OdeM). Dans un deuxième temps, un volet de musique actuelle représentant le travail de création de quelques-unes de compositrices canadiennes les plus connues fera l’objet d’un autre concert. Lorraine Vaillancourt dirigera alors deux ensembles, soit l’Atelier de musique contemporaine de l’Université de Montréal et le NEM, qui exécuteront la musique de Michelle Boudreau, Chantal Laplante, Alexina Louie Isabelle Panneton et Micheline Coulombe Saint-Marcoux.

En matière d’exploration, le point de mire sur de grandes figures de la création au féminin s’articulera autour des œuvres de Pauline Oliveros, Magali Babin, Anne Bourne, Joane Hétu et Gayle Young. De ces compositrices-interprètes, on retrouvera Joane Hétu à la voix et au saxophone alto, Magali Babin à la guitare électrique et Anne Bourne à la voix et au violoncelle. Un des événements qui risque aussi d’attirer particulièrement l’attention est le théâtre musical intitulé Talk Show/Han n 17, de Marie Pelletier, dans une mise en scène de la chanteuse et comédienne France Castel. Cette performance sera placée sous la direction de Walter Boudreau.

Du côté des patenteuses et installatrices, un programme entièrement dévolu aux installations, ordinateurs et autres objets mettra en valeur les ressources parfois insoupçonnées de divers matériaux sonores. Diane Landry, Sarah Peebles, Hélène Boissinot et Sylvie Chenard, qui fondent en partie leur discours sur une appropriation des objets familiers et sur un arsenal sophistiqué de l’écriture d’avantgarde, miseront à plein sur les potentialités de l’inusité. Deux programmes de musique électroacoustique prendront la forme de soirées carte blanche à Chantal Laplante, qui a retenu un impressionnant parcours allant de Jenya à Hildegard Westerkamp.

Au sein de cette grande fête, le Quatuor Claudel s’inscrit quant à lui dans une veine esthétique plus «traditionnelle» en proposant des musiques pour quatuor à cordes de Murphy Smith, Goubaïdoulina, Taaffe Zwilich et Coulombe Saint-Marcoux.

Ce grand Micmac présente également une exposition dans le corridor de la Place des Arts de même qu’une série de tables rondes articulées autour de la création qui s’engage au féminin. La plupart des concerts ont lieu au Musée d’art contemporain.

Femmes au présent

Francois Tousignant, Le Devoir, October 28, 2000

Dans le cadre du Super MicMac l’Ensemble contemporain dé (ECM) vous invite dimanche aprés-midi, à découvrir la musiqué imaginée par cinq compositrices d’ici. La baguette de Véronique Lacroix ne dérougit pas d’inventer des programmes originaux ainsi, au Musée d’art contemporain dé Montréal, on pourra entendre des œuvres d’Emily Doolittle, Rose Bolton, Suzanne Hébert-Tremblay, Ana Sokolović et Estelle Lemire. La variété des esthétiques est aussi grande que celle des sensibilités. La question se posait autrefois de savoir s’il existe une musique spécifiquement «féminine». Pour mieux s’en faire une idée, ajouter des éléments dans sa quête d’une réponse, il n’y a guère d’autre méthode que d’accourir entendre leurs œuvres. Peut-étre même uniquement pour se rendre compte de la vanité de la question.

New-music fête pays homage to the past

Alan Conter, The Globe and Mail, October 27, 2000

The program calls it a celebration, a fête. If it was taking place in Cape Breton, it would be a ceilidh. But in Montréal, where acronyms are a must in public labelling, this gathering of women composers and performers is called the Super Micmac (not to be confused with Mi’kmaq). Want to know what it stands for? Musiciennes innovatrices canadiennes—musiques actuelles et contemporaines, and it’s the brainchild of composer-improviser-percussionist Danielle Roger.

After two arduous years, the fête began on Wednesday night at the Beverly Webster Rolph Hall of Montréal’s Musée d’art contemporain with an immensely appropriate homage to Mary Travers, aka La Bolduc—more on her in a moment.

From now until Nov. 12, the Super Micmac will celebrate musicmaking by Canadian women (mostly Canadian, mostly women), past and present, with the emphasis on the present. There will be 17 concerts as diverse as the Montréal Symphony under the baton of Lorraine Vaillancourt, the Vancouver Improvising Ensemble of Women, the stunning Quatuor Claudel, and the spinning of DJs Mighty Kat, Krista, Soul Sista and Maüs.

Thankfully, almost everything about the festival defies strict definition. The practitioners can debate the merits of musique actuelle and musique nouuelle in the conferences, werkshops and roundtable discussions that will frame the event. Listeners need only peruse the program, which is available online at www.supermusique.qc.ca, and chose.

It is in keeping with Roger’s warmth and sensibility to open this gathering with an evening of improvisation on the music of Travers. By the time she died in 1941 at the age of 47, Travers was the undisputed star of the Quebec recording industry. But-unlike Ginette Reno, who eschews the Harleys that some of her clients favour for her own two-tone Bentley, or Céline Dion, who splits her time between Quebec and her Stateside compound, La Bolduc was a singer whose roots in popular culture were entrenched. Her ties to the people she sang about were real because she knew the burden of grinding poverty—only four of the 13 children she bore would survive early childhood.

Her songs, though, were rooted in the Celtic rhythms she learned in the Gaspé, and her Iyrics were bitingly funny. As her popularity grew, no power was too lofty for her to skewer and no joy too small to celebrate.

At first it might seem incongruous that the cutting-edge, urban scene that is improvised music would be at home with the foottapping, fiddling, reeling sound of La Bolduc—but not really. Musicians who gravitate to the world of improvisation go there to escape the commercial, formulaic riffs of standard jazz and the mind-numbing “artistry" of manufactured pop. Improvisers love to play with whatever source is at hand, and quoting the past is an integral element of the work. It often becomes very much about shared memory, and La Bolduc is at the source of so much of Quebec pop.

The element of incongruity, of course, is that a new-music audience is an elite audience. Unlike Travers, the excellent musicians on stage last night are never heard on pop radio, are never in rotation on Musique Plus or MuchMusic, and are not attempting to reach a mass audience in the way the woman they eulogize did so easily.

In the homage to Travers, Roger invited six other women to join her in arranging Bolduc songs: Allison Cameron, Lori Freedman, Lee Pui Ming, Marie Pelletier, Joane Hétu and Diane Labrosse. Some arrangements were more successful than others.

Jean Denis conducted the ensemble that included the voice of Gabrielle Bouthillier, Fabienne: Bélair and Pierre Tanguay on percussion, Jean Derome and Jean-Denis Levasseur on reeds, Labrosse on accordion and sampler, Kristin Molnar on violin, and Pierre Cartier and Marc Villemur on guitars and bass.

Quitte pour quitte began the concert with a heavy aboriginal rhythm. The hannting phrasing of Iyric fragments by Bouthillier soon evolved into a spirited, revisited jig. It was followed by a disappointing meander through Fin Fin, in which Cameron thought it might be a good idea to have Bouthillier sing through a kazoo—it wasn’t.

Freedman’s Les Filles de campagne was a moving, lilting arrangement of a Bolduc homily warning girls not to go off with the first city beau they might find appealing.

Then Lee weighed in with Les maringouins about the dreaded onslaught of the mosquito. Give improvisers a buzzing insect and they’re off like horseflies to a thoroughbred. A little obviius, but good fun.

Pelletier’s 7 variations et thème sur La Pitoune also added a light touch, as the variations mocked baroque and classical forms.

The final two pieces were by long-time collaborators of Roger, Hétu and Labrosse. That these three have more than 20 years of close work to share and know the ensemble well was proven in their ability to offer the tightest work of the night.

Tonight, Cris et Chants, with songs and voices from Quebec, Ontario, Nunavik and British Columbia. And later in this celebration, music from Hildegard Westerkamp, Micheline Coulombe Saint-Marcoux, Pauline Oliveros and other heroines of music too numerous to mention.

De-boxing Day

Maria Simpson, Hour, October 26, 2000

First, let’s get one thing straight: The SuperMicMac Festival has nothing to do with native people. MicMac is an acronym for “musiciennes innovatrices canadiennes; musiques actuelles et contemporaines" Organized by Supermémé, a production company that specializes in musique actuelle, this festival offers three weeks of concerts, discussions and exhibations celebrating the contributions of women to 20th century music in Canada.

Much like the Millennium Symphony, the collective contemporary musk extravaganza that oocurred at the beginning of the summer, the SuperMicMac Festival will bring together diverse groups and composers, except this time the focus is on the ladies. Performers inclurde the modern harpsichordist vive’ vincent, the Claudel strinq quartet, the Nouvel Ensemble Modeme, the Montréal Symphony Orchestra (led by Lorraine Vailancourt, director of the NEM), the jazz ensemble VIEW and DJ Maüs. Each performance will feature a different facet of female performers and composers in new music.

At a café on St-Denis, Diane Labrosse and Danielle Pallardy Roger, directors of Supermémé. explain their mission for the SuperMicMac Festival. “For me, the important issue was to reunite musique actuelle, contemporary music, electro and new invented instruments," states Roger. “A few years ago, all these groups were in opposition. Fot now, events like the Millennium Symphony and MicMac show that we all want to be more complete"

In each program, Labrosse and Roger tried to combine music that People might be familiar with and more excentric selections. The opening concert, for example, Hommage a La Bolduc, features the music of popular Québécoise folk singer La Bolduc who wrote songs in the 1930s. “We thought she was representative of what we try to carry out in our company, Supermémé, says Labrosse. “She is sort of a ’supermama’ herself"

The reels and jigs of Québec have been interpreted by seven composers from vastly different genres. Roger, who is contributing a music actuelle composition to the concert constructed her piece as an expose about La Bolduc’s life. “For me it was important to make an allusion to the life of Bolduc, she says, conspiratorially. “I believe that she had a lover in the North, but she loved him only when she wanted to."

This elicited many chuckles from Labrosse and cries of “Whoa! Whoa!" but soon the conversation again turned to serious matters. When asked if they believed that there was a difference between the music written by men and women, both Roger and Labrosse responded passionately. “It is very clear - music is music," replies Labrosse; “When you lump people together you also create a space around them. The wonderful thing about this festival is that it reunites a lot of different organizations in different kinds of music… Otherwise you are all in little genres and you put people into a box. So I guess it’s De-boxing Day. I just thought of that.

So while the festival is focussing on women only, SuperMicMac will present many types of music and demonstrate where the lines blur. “We’ve tried to give people the opportunity to hear something famiiiar and something new’ sums up Labrosse. “It’s a sort of ’Now that your here, lock the door!’“

Do, ré, mi, fa, sol, la Bolduc

Solange Lévesque, Le Devoir, October 26, 2000

Réconcilier madame Bolduc une icône de la musique traditionnelle québécoise, avec la «musique actuelle» qui fait encore peur à bien du monde: un réve, presque une utopie! Le rêve de Diane Labrosse instigatrice de l’Hommage à la Bolduc créé hier au musée d’Art contemporain aprés deux ans d’élaboration. Diane Labrosse et les six autres compositrices du Québec, de l’Ontario, du Manitoba et de la Colombie Britannique qu’elle a invitées se sont chacune inspirées d’une chanson de «la superMémé par excellence» (dixit Diane Labrosse) pour créer une pièce musicale avec des sonorités contemporaines.

Les Maringouins Fin Fin Bigaouette, Toujours l R-100, Le Sauvage du nord, Les Filles de campagne, Ça va venir et La Pitoune se sont donc trouvées rafraîchies et parfois joyeusement secouées par l’imagination et les références personnelles mises à profit par les compositrices. Les racines de ce spectacle remontent aux années 1920 et 1930, ses fruits ont la fraîcheur du sourire de Mary Travers (1894-1941) dite la Bolduc, d’après le nom de son mari. Sans le savoir, madame Bolduc a fait œuvre historique et ethnologiqùe. Le regard ironique et incisif qu’elle porte sur son monde et qui éclaire ses chansons (plus d’une centaine qu’elle appelait ses «chansons d’actualité») nous apprend à quoi pouvait ressembler le Québec de l’entre-deux-guerres. Née à Newport en Gaspésie, MaryTravers quitte sa famille à 13 ans pour venir gagner sa vie à Montréal. Comme elle sait chanter turluter, jouer du violon, de l’harmonica et de la bombarde on l’engage bientôt aux très populaires «Veillées du bon vieux temps» qui se tiennent au Monument national. Un premier 78 tours en 1927, et c’est la renommée, les tournées qui s’enchaînent. Le peuple est conquis mais, évidemment, une certaine élite résiste; le snobisme n’a pas d’âge. Se représente-t-on assez l’exploit? Une mère de 12 enfants qui proméne ses chansons de salle paroissiale en boîte de variétés, à une époque où les femmes n’avaient pas encore le droit de vote! Michel Garneau, qui assurait les liens entre les pièces, l’a présentée avec beaucoup de pertinence et avec tout le respect qu’elle mérite, insistant sur sa valeur en tant qu’artiste. «L’hommage de ce soir est bien agréable et parfaitement nécessaire» a-t-il affirmé au début de la soirée. Aujourd’hui, un groupe de femmes puise dans les mélodies de madame Bolduc, joue avec ses rythmes et traduit son style poétique et mélodique dans leur langue musicale personnelle. Avant elles, Charles Trenet, Clémence Des Rochers, Luc Plamondon, Plume Latraverse, pour ne citer que ceux-là, ont avoué s’être inspirés de cette phénoménale chansonnière et pionnière.

Elle peut être fière, Diane Labrosse; son idée donne lieu à un spectacle festif, ludique, plein d’accents étonnants, joyeux ou dramatiques, et qui a le mérite d’amalgamer le violon du terroir et l’échantillonneur. Il faut découvrir la beauté dépouillée de la chanson Le Sauvage du Nord qui devient Quitte pour quitte, selon Danielle Palardy Roger. Il faut voir-le sens que prennent les 7 Variations et thème sur La Pitoune de Marie Pelletier, avec son passage à la manière de Cold Song du King Arthur de Purcell! Et, après que Michel Garneau en ait rappelé les paroles, écouter Ça va venir qui devıent Découragez-nous pas cuisinée par Diane Labrosse.

SuperMicMac SuperMémé SuperMusique: une superveillée qui fait swinger les mémoires et les coeurs. Elle sera bientôt diffusée aux «Décrocheurs d’étoiles» à la deuxième chaine de la radio de Radio-Canada.

Hommage à LA super-mémé: La Bolduc

Alain Brunet, La Presse, October 25, 2000

Le SuperMicMac, cette vaste célébration des musiciennes innovatrices canadiennes, démarre aujourd’hui avec un concert hommage La Bolduc, figure populaire par excellence de la musique populaire québécoise. Un choix parfaitement justifié pour inaugurer cette série de concerts qui s’échelonnent jusqu’au dinanche 12 novembre.

Au cours du siècle dernier, au fait, quelle autre artiste québécoise de la musique populaire a ainsi fait l’unanimité?

«La super-mémé par excellence», tranche Diane Labrosse, instigatrice de ce concert hommage présenté ce soir et demain au Musé d’art contemporain. A la tête d’un aréopage de compositrices dites «sérieuses», elle a mis en œuvre une évocation de celle qui domina 16 chanson québécoise de 1927 à 1941.

«La Bolduc, fait observer la musicienne, allait chercher beaucoup de monde mais elle était boudée par l’intelligentsia. Elle chantait comme le monde ordinaire, et le monde ordinaire s’identifiait à elle. Et ses disques se vendaient à une vitesse folle. A la porte de chez Archambault, ça faisait la queue sur un coin de rue lorsque ses disques étaient mis en vente. Une personne devenue célèbre très trés vite auprès des gens ordinaires. Parce qu’elle chantait comme eux. Parce qu’elle leur parlait directement. De leurs vrais problèmes, de leur vécu.»

Sept compositrices canadiennes et québécoises, issues des écoles contemporaine ou actuelle, ont été présenties pour mener à bien le proiet de Diane Labrosse.

«Il s’agissait de partir d’une chanson de La Bolduc et faire autre chose, ce qu’elles avaient envie de faire. C’était assez libre, en somme, mais il ne fallait pas composer à sa manière. Il fallait plutôt s’en inspirer et créer autre chose.»

Ainsi, Les Maringouins ont piqué Lee Pui Ming, Finfin Bigaouette a eu le même effet sur Allison Cameron, Toujours L’R-IOO (inspiré du fameux dirigeable qui avait ébloui le Québec au début du siècle précédent) a fait flyer Joane Hétu, Le Sauvage du Nord s’est transformé en Kit pour Kit du côté de Danielle Palardy Roger, Les Filles de Campagne ont charmé Lori Freedman, Découragez-vous pas a encouragé Diane Labrosse à marcher plus loin dans le pays de Mary Travers, sept variations et thèmes sur La Pitoune ont éte imaginés par Marie Pelletier.

«Ce ne sont pas les sept plus grands succès de La Bolduc, tient à préciser Diane Labrosse. C’est plutôt aléatoire, finalement. Prenez les musiciennes anglophones: elles ne connaissaient pas le travail de La Bolduc, ce fut pour elles toute une découverte.»

La méthodologie de Diane Labrosse a été la suivante: «J’ai écouté l’intégrale de La Bolduc pour ensuite sélectionner des groupes de cinq chansons que j’ai proposés à chacune des musiciennes. Ces dernières en ont gardé une. Je voulais ainsi éviter qu’on se ramasse avec des pièces trop semblables. Évidemment, il ne s’agit pas d’un résuné représentatif de l’œuvre de La Bolduc, encore moins d’une compilation de ses plus grands succès. Nous proposons plutôt un répertoire varié de chansons qui nous ont inspirées.»

Faut-il en déduire que la relecture des chansons de La Bolduc s’est faite dans une totale liberté?

«Certaines compositrices, explique Diane Labrosse, ont pris la chanson au pied de la lettre, d’autres ont emprunté d’autres chemins. Par exemple, la pièce d’Allison Cameron est vraiment très loin de Finfin Bigaouette. La composition de Joane Hétu l’est également; elle a pris le prétexte de Toujours l’RIOO pour explorer l’univers des machines volantes en faisant une toute petite place à la mélodie de la chanson.»

Sous la direction de l’altiste Jean René, I’Hommage à La Bolduc sera interprété par l’Ensemble SuperMusique —la percussionniste Fabienne Bélair, la chanteuse Gabrielle Bouthiller, le contrebassiste Pierre Cartier, le multi-instrumentiste Jean Derome, le pianisie Jacques Drouin, la claviériste et échantilonneure Diane Labrosse (instrumentiste au même titre que ses collègues dans ce cadre), le clarinettiste Jean-Denis Levasseur, la violoniste Kristin Molnar, le percussionniste Pierre Tanguay et le guitariste Marc Villemure.

Peut-être quelques légers soubresauts sont à prévoir, mais il est peu probable que La Bolduc se r’vire dans sa tombe.

Suivez la guide

Serge Camirand, Voir, October 19, 2000

La rétrospective SuperMicMac comprend tout un volet de musique contemporaine composée, interprétée et dirigée par des musiciennes. Ainsi, le 29 octobre, au Musée d’art contemporain (MAC) de Montréal, le concert ECM relève-ContemporElles nous donnera la chance d’entendre, sous la direction de Véronique Lacroix, des œuvres de compositrices âgées de 30 à40 ans, soit Rose Bolton, Emily Doolittle, Suzanne Hébert-Tremblay, Ana Sokolic et Estelle Lemire (qui, pour la création de son œuvre, sera aussi aux ondes Martenot avec Geneviève Grenier). Le lendemain, 30 octobre, à la maison de la culture Frontenac, dans le cadre des Lundis d’Edgar, Christine Lemelin nous offrira un récital commenté composé des coups de coeur de la pionnière Eva Gauthier. Au programme: Poulenc, Ravel, Gershwin, Stravinski. Le 2 novembre, au Théâtre Maisonneuve de la Place des Arts, pour lancer la série L’OSM au présent, l’Orchestre symphonique de Montréal sera placé sous la direction de Lorraine Vaillancourt, avec la participation de la soprano Louise Marcotte, dans un programme ne comportant bizarrement que des pièces de compositeurs mâles, à savoir: Michel Longtin, Philippe Boesmans, Michael Oesterle et George Benjamin. Le 3 novembre, au MAC, une partie de la soirée Des solistes exceptionnelles est réservée à Rivka Golani, altiste réputée, dans des œuvres d’Anne Lauber, Ann Southam et Sara Scott Turner. Le lendemain, 4 novembre, toujours au MAC, la soirée Les grandes exploratrices nous donnera entre autres l’occasion d’entendre Gayle Young à l’amaranth, instrument de son invention, en trio avec Anne Bourne au violoncelle et à la voix, et Angelique van Berlo à l’accordéon à basses chromatiques. On retrouvera Lorraine Vaillancourt, le 5 novembre, encore au MAC, à la tête d’abord de l’Atelier de musique contemporaine de l’Université de Montréal dans des pièces de Michelle Boudreau, Micheline Coulombe Saint-Marcoux (grande pionnière trop tôt disparue), Chantale Laplante et Alexina Louie, et ensuite du Nouvel Ensemble Moderne dans une œuvre d’Isabelle Panneton. Le 8 novembre, le Quatuor Claudel, entièrement féminin pour ceux qui ne le sauraient pas, nous invite à la salle Pierre-Mercure pour l’audition de l’unique composition pour quatuor à cordes de Micheline Coulombe Saint-Marcoux, ainsi que d’œuvres des Canadiennes Kelly-Mare Murphy et Linda Catlin Smith, mais aussi de la Russe Sofia Goubaïdoulina et de l’Américaine Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. Enfin, du 9 au 12 novembre, l’Ensemble de la SMCQ et quatre chanteurs dirigés par Walter Boudreau nous présentent au Théâtre La Chapelle, dans une mise en scène de France Castel, une pièce de théâtre musical de Marie Pelletier intitulée Talk-Show/Han n 17, où les figures de Don Juan et de Carmen s’affronteront.

N’oublions pas qu’au cours du SuperMicMac, du 25 octobre au 12 novembre, dans le Corridor des pas perdus, à la Place des Arts, se tiendra l’exposition Portraits des pionnières d’hier à aujourd’hui, montée sous la direction de Mireille Gagné, et que le 1er novembre, à la Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur, Marie-Thérèse Lefebvre donnera une conférence sur ce thème prometteur: La face cachée de l’histoire des femmes dans le milieu musical montréalais.

SuperMicMac histoire de filles

Nicolas Tittley, Voir, October 19, 2000

La semaine dernière, elles étaient des centaines de milliers à marcher dans le monde entier pour crier haut et fort leur différence et leurs revendications. Du 25 octobre au 15 novembre, les femmes feront à nouveau du bruit, beaucoup de bruit, lors de l’événement SuperMicMac, consacré aux musiciennes et compositrices ayant marqué le siècle au Canada. Actuelles, électroacoustiques, improvisées, osées: toutes les musiques de création et d’innovation seront mises en lumière. Bref, c’est l’avant-garde sous toutes ses formes qui trouvera une vitrine de choix, avec, exceptionnellement, un nombre impressionnant de femmes à l’avant-scène.

Pour la directrice de ce grand pow-wow, Danielle Palardy Roger, ces trois semaines d’activités représentent le couronnement de deux décennies de travail. Percussionniste férue d’improvisation, compositrice et grande organisatrice, elle est une infatigable championne des musiques nouvelles. Lorsqu’elle a fondé les Productions SuperMémé à la fin des années soixante-dix, en compagnie de ses consoeurs Joane Hétu et Diane Labrosse, Danielle cherchait non seulement à faire entendre la musique de leur groupe, Wondeur Brass, mais aussi à promouvoir une musique de création, non commerciale, en mettant l’accent sur la production des femmes. Nous en étions alors aux premiers balbutiements de la fameuse scène de la musique dite actuelle, et de l’étiquette Ambiances Magnétiques. «Il fallait qu’on fonde notre maison de production simplement pour booker nos propres spectacles. À l’époque, c’était un choc de voir un groupe de filles débarquer comme ça; c’était déjà assez déroutant pour les gens de faire face à des musiques aussi libres et ça ajoutait un élément déstabilisant.»

Au fil des ans, SuperMémé fera son nid et présentera des événements d’envergure, comme le Festival international des musiciennes innovatrices ou Les Muses au Musée, mais rien toutefois qui arrive à la cheville de ce SuperMicMac. Profitant de la folie des rétrospectives entourant l’arrivée du nouveau millnaire (et des subventions qui s’y rattachent), Danielle Palardy Roger est allée frapper à la porte des subventionnaires pour célébrer le millénaire au féminin. Partout, on l’a accueillie à bras ouverts («Avec un timing comme celui-là, ils ne pouvaient pas refuser!» lance-t-elle). Deux ans après les premières ébauches, le projet voit enfin le jour.

Le nom de l’événement, en apparence innocent, est en fait un judicieux acronyme: Mic, comme dans «musiciennes innovatrices canadiennes»; et Mac comme dans «musiques actuelles et contemporaines». «C’est pourquoi on ne touche pas à certains genres tels le rock ou même le jazz, qu’on effleure à peine. Je voulais des musiques non commerciales, des musiques de création. C’est la raison pour laquelle la plupart des œuvres sont postérieures aux années soixante, alors que commence vraiment l’exploration sonore au Canada.»

Women’s Lib? Présenté quelques semaines de la Marche mondiale des femmes, on pourrait supposer que le SuperMicMac revêt un caractère éminemment politique, voire revendicateur. Mais Danielle Palardy Roger tient à préciser qu’il s’agit d’abord d’une célébration et non d’une occasion de manifester. «Je n’ai pas organisé cet événement pour revendiquer quoi que ce soit, mais pour rendre un hommage aux femmes et à la musique que j’aime. Je ne me sens plus habitée par cet esprit de revendication que j’ai vécu autrefois. Pour moi, SuperMicMac c’est comme un passage de témoin, une célébration pour se souvenir de ces fonceuses qui nous ont ouvert la voie, et pour reconnaître l’importance de celles qui travaillent aujourd’hui pour les générations à venir. Ce n’est pas un ghetto; je ne veux pas en faire un événement récurrent; il s’agit simplement de braquer le projecteur et souligner le fait que les œuvres de compositrices sont souvent ignorées.»

Mais si l’heure n’est plus à la provocation et à la revendication, est-ce à dire que le combat est presque gagné? «Aujourd’hui, on est reconnues en tant que compositrices et, plus important encore, n tant qu’innovatrices. Au sein d’Ambiances Magnétiques, il y a toujours eu un esprit égalitaire; mais il y a encore du chemin à faire. Le seul fait qu’on doive organiser un événement comme SuperMicMac prouve à quel point la présence des femmes en musique est encore rare. Regarde la programmation de l’OSM: ils organisent une série nouvelle, présentée dans le cadre du MicMac, avec Lorraine Vaillancourt comme chef, et ils ne présentent pas une seule œuvre composée par une femme!»

Même si l’on a quelques scrupules à la poser, on ne peut éviter la grande question que soulève forcément la tenue d’un tel événement: «Existe-t-il une musique typiquement féminine?» Danielle hésite un instant, un peu lasse d’avoir à répondre à nouveau à cette question qui semble tellement évidente mais qui peut en même temps s’avérer un problème insondable. «On parle bien de la musique noire, de la musique arabe ou indienne, pourquoi n’existerait-il pas une musique de femmes? À partir du moment où l’on reconnaît que les femmes sont différentes des hommes, qu’elles forment, en quelque sorte, un groupe culturel distinct, pourquoi n’auraient-elles pas un son propre? C’est la même chose pour le cinéma: je ne sais pas s’il y a un cinéma de femmes, mais je pense que des réalisatrices comme Agnès Varda ont certainement apporté des traits féminins à leur œuvre, une certaine intériorité peut-être. Mais, au bout du compte, ce n’est pas sectaire: c’est de la musique et c’est pour tout le monde!»

Pour tenter de répondre à cette épineuse question, le SuperMicMac propose une exposition intitulée Portraits des pionnières d’hier à aujourd’hui, dans le Corridor des pas perdus de la Place des Arts. Aux visiteurs de se faire une idée.

Mary Travers, SuperMémé Ce n’est pas par hasard que cette célébration de la musique au féminin s’ouvre sur un hommage à la grande turluteuse Mary Travers, alias La Bolduc. D’une part, bien qu’elle ait eu une portée universelle, l’œuvre de La Bolduc est intrinsèquement féminine: «En effet, seuleune femme pouvait faire ce qu’elle a fait», souligne Danielle. Mais il s’agit également d’une pionnière à bien des niveaux, et son exemple de ténacité est encore tout aussi valable aujourd’hui. «C’est un personnage inspirant pour toutes les musiciennes; cette femme, c’est un monument; c’est notre Oum Khalsoum à nous! Tout le monde connaît la Bolduc comme chanteuse; mais peu de gens parlent du fait qu’elle était aussi sa propre auteure-compositrice. C’était également une femme d’affaires, qui organisait ses tournées, s’occupait de ses contrats de disques, etc. Elle faisait tout; en fait, c’était la première SuperMémé!»

L’idée de consacrer un hommage à cette grande dame de la chanson populaire est de Diane Labrosse, la spécialiste ès échantillonnages de la bande SuperMémé. Labrosse a approché sept compositrices (dont Lee Pui Ming, Joane Hétu, Lori Freedman et Danielle Roger elle-même); leur demandant de réarranger des chansons du répertoire de La Bolduc. «Pour nous, c’était tout naturel, explique Danielle, qui ne jouera toutefois pas son arrangement. Contrairement à la musique contemporaine, la musique actuelle s’est toujours inspirée des traditions populaires.»

Des héritières de Mary Travers aux adeptes de la musique sur bande, en passant par les chants de gorge inuits et l’expérimentation électronique, SuperMicMac ratisse large. Une place considérable est faite aux musiques contemporaine et électroacoustique (voir le texte de notre collègue Serge Camirand ci-contre); mais toutes les formes de musiques vivantes y seront représentées. Le Vancouver Improvising Ensemble of Women (VIEW), qu’on a déjà pu apercevoir au Festival de Jazz, fait partie des concerts dignes de mention, tout comme la soirée des grandes exploratrices, où l’on pourra observer, entre autres, les étranges manipulations - très physiques - d’objets métalliques et de guitare préparée de Magali Babin et les explorations vocales de Joane Hétu, qui soufflera aussi dans son instrument de prédilection, le saxophone. Et on s’en voudrait d’oulier la soirée du 7 novembre, aux installations pour ordinateurs et objets.

Quant aux «Djettes», qui abondent à Montréal, elles seront également fort bien représentées: vous pourrez goûter aux talents de quatre d’entre elles (Maüs, Krista, Mighty Kat et Soul Sista) lors de 5 à 7 présentés au Laïka. «Pour moi, c’était fondamental de souligner leur présence, parce qu’elles sont les artistes de la nouvelle lutherie, explique Danielle. L’approche de la musique est en train de se transformer radicalement par l’entremise des D.J. et l’on ne pouvait ignorer ce courant dans un événement consacré aux nouvelles musiques.»

Il y a une femme que vous ne verrez pas sur scène, toutefois, et c’est Danielle Palardy Roger. «J’ai décidé de ne pas jouer pour me consacrer entièrement à l’organisation. C’est une entreprise énorme, mais je suis très sereine par rapport à ce choix. Je travaille à ce projet depuis deux ans et je ne voulais pas faire un événement portant uniquement sur la musique actuelle. Je voulais quelque chose de rassembleur, un peu dans la lignée de la Symphonie du Millénaire. Pour moi, c’est un événement de développement, qui va au-delà de l’aspect féminin. Les œuvres des femmes ne sont pas assez jouées, c’est vrai; mais c’est le problème de la plupart des musiques de création. Je suis persuadée que si les gens ont accès à ces musiques, ils découvriront quelque chose qui risque les toucher.»

Femmes en tête

Catherine Perrey, Ici Montréal, October 19, 2000

Danielle Palardy Roger a été propulsée directrice générale et coordonnatrice de cet événement tentaculaire par ses collègues des productions SuperMémé-SuperMusique (PSM), Joane Hétu et Diane Labrosse. Tout un éventail de musiques de création sont à l’honneur: musique actuelle, musique contemporaine, musique bruitiste, jazz, création radio, musique électroacoustique et DJ sur le sundae! Cela n’a l’air de rien, mais il y a quatre ans seulement, le torchon brûlait. Musique contemporaine contre musique actuelle, laquelle allait remporter la médaille de la modernité? «C’était vraiment la guerre. Mais la préparation de la Symphonie du millénaire, les Musiques au présent à Québec, les symphonies portuaires et la rencontre autour du thème musique écrite - musique improvisée ont cassé des barrières. Il y a maintenant une énorme volonté de rapprochement, au niveau de la collaboration et des métissages», souligne Danielle Palardy Roger. Et l’avènement de lo musique techno a sans doute rajouté de l’huile pour faire monter la mayonnaise et rendre encore plus floues des frontières infantiles et archaïques.

À la baguette

En ce qui concerne le programme, il fallait mettre sur pied un événement éclectique. Pour l’inauguration, le 25 octobre, Diane Labrosse propose son Hommage à La Bolduc, et a conflé des morceaux pour relecture à des compositrices de tout acabit. «C’était une musicienne déJà tellement innovatrice. Elle s’occupait de sa musique, organisait elle-même des tournées. Pour nous, La Bolduc, c’est le prototype de la ‘Super Mémé’, ajoute Roger. Un projet tout à fait «actuel» lorsqu’on connait le goût des actualistes pour la relecture du patrimoine populaire. En musique contemporaine, on est particulièrement gâtés à Montréal, Véronique Lacroix et Lorraine Vaillancourt, chefs de l’ECM et du NEM, tiennent le haut du pavé et dirigeront ECM relève-ContemporElles le 29 octobre, ainsi que les 2 concerts Chefs de file des 2 et 5 novembre. Fait exceptionnel, le 2 novembre,I’OSM inaugurera sa sérle L’OSM au présent en confiant la baguette à Lorraine Vaillancourt.

«C’est la première fols que l’OSM met une série de musique contemporaine sur pied!», signale Danlelle Roger. Les musiciennes bruitistes-manipulatrices, qui frayent sur le macadam depuis plusieurs années déjà à Montréal, s’éclateront dans deux soirées, avec entre autres le volet Installations, ordinateurs et objets, le 7 novembre, qui mettra notamment en scène Sylvie Chenard et Hélene Boissinot. Bien sûr, le volet numéro 8 de la série de musique électroacoustique Rien à Voir, dont la direction artistique a été confiée à Chantale Laplante, sera au féminin pluriel. Et signalons joyeusement l’avènement des DJettes qui animeront quatre apéros au Laïka, dont DJ Maüs et DJ Krista, qui sillonnent allègrement dans un techno monde très masculin. Yes Sir, madame!

A Musical Legacy Worth Celebrating

Tamara Bernstein, National Post, no. 2,306, October 17, 2000

The estrogen level in Montréal is set to spike next week when SuperMicMac — an 18-day, one-time celebration of “the creative contribution that women have made to the evolution of 20th-century Canadian music" — gets underway. From the joyful songs of La Bolduc (1894-1941, Canada’s first chansonnière) to cutting-edge electro-acoustic compositions and from a new musical by Marie Pelletier that puts Don Juan and Carmen together on a TV talk show to a lecture on the history of Canadian jazz women, SuperMicMac will cut a wide swath through the genres of music in which Canadian women — often swimming upstream against a strong current — have distinguished themselves.

On the performing end, the talent includes virtuoso violist Rivka Golani and high-voltage improvisers such as pianist Lee Pui Ming and bass clarinetist Lori Freedman. (Freedman appears with the Vancouver-based Women in View ensemble and is one of six composers who’ve arranged a song by La Bolduc.) Conductor Lorraine Vaillancourt, who’s brought Montréal’s Nouvel Ensemble Moderne to international prominence, makes her scandalously long-overdue Montréal Symphony Orchestra debut as part of SuperMicMac; five women DJs will hold forth at the Laïka bar — one of the city’s few venues that presents female DJs.

Over 13 concerts, audiences will hear music by rising star composers such as Ana Sokalovic (Montréal), Rose Bolton (Toronto) and Kelly Marie Murphy (Halifax), as well as “established figures such as Ann Southam (Toronto), in a lineup that spans the entire country. An exhibition called Le Corridor des pas perdus (The Corridor of Lost Footsteps) will pay tribute to women of the past — especially the three pioneering figures who died within a few weeks of each other this year: Violet Archer, Barbara Pentland and Jean Coulthard.

To myknowledge, SuperMicMac is the largest and most varied festival of its kind ever held in this country. The “MicMac" in the title, by the way, doesn’t have anything to do with the First Nation tribe. Originally spelled “mique-maque," the word came from the 7th-century French meutemacre — adapted in turn from the Dutch muytmaker — both werds meaning rebel or troublemaker (sometimes in an affectionate sense).

“It seemed a perfect name for the event," SuperMicMac‘s artistic director, Danielle Palardy Roger, explained from Montréal.

But the festival’s tone is celebratory. “We’re not out to settle scores," said Palardy Roger. (The bad pun is my translation; we were speaking French.) “We want to show how strong these women are — as the saying goes, a woman has to be twice as good to get half as far as a man — and how important women were [in Canadian music] throughout the century."

Most importantly, as Freedman remarked over the phone from her Winnipeg home, “it looks like it’s going to be a great festival, whether or not you’re into the politics [of women in music3]."

But it’s worth taking a wee lock at those politics. There’s no question that women composers are becoming more and more visible in Canada. Toronto composer Alexina Louie says we’re far ahead of Europe, where there are fewer women writing music and less of their werk gets performed.

The Winnipeg New Music Festival, for instance, has feted Linda Bouchard, Louie and U.S. composer Joan Tower, among other women. The Toronto Symphony Orchestra recently appointed the gifted Barbara Croall as one of its composer-advisors.

Louie, meanwhile, is breaking new ground with an opera she’s writing for the Canadian Opera Company; slated for performance in 2002, this will be the first full-scale opera commission in Canada that’s gone to a woman, as far as I know.

And some institutions are clearly sensitive to possibilities of prejudice (of any sort): the CBC’s Young Composer Competition presents the jury with anonymous scores.

So do we still need festivals of women’s music? Do such events imply special pleading and ghettoize women? I can’t see that happening at SuperMicMac, with so many strong composers and so many top-of-the-line, high-voltage performers and improvisers.

And if you think we don’t need to raise the profile of women in music, consider the following statistics: Janet Danielson, president of the Association of Canadian Women Composers, estimates that about 40% of Canada’s composers are women. Yet an official from the Canada Council told her that on a series of recent Canada Council juries for new works, only 7% of the performers and presenters were asking for money to c ommission pieces from women. (The women recaived 10% of the available money.) And only about 25% of new music played by major orchestras and new music ensembles is by women, Danielson said from her Vancouver home.

“At an institutional level there’s still a tremendous inequity," she said. “If it were in engineering or something, it would considered scandalous."

The cream, she says, does seem to rise to the top, regardless of gender. “[Calgary-born] Heather Schmidt, Kelly Marie Murphy — of course these are absolutely first-rate women who are achieving a certain amount of prominence," Danielson said. «But I guess I11 be satisfied when there are as many second-rate pieces by women programmed as there are by men."

Danielson had no statistics on the proportion of women teaching composition in Canada’s music faculties — crucial positions of mentorship that also provide composers with prestige, financial security and funds to travel and “network" with presenters and other composers.

So I trolled the Web sites of five major Canadian universities last night, tallying up male and female composition teachers. The picture was not pretty. University of Montréal: six men to one woman (Isabelle Panneton). McGill: seven men, no women. University of Toronto: six men to one woman (Larysa Kuzmenko). University of Calgary: three men, no women. University of British Columbia: five men, no women.

Small wonder, then, that Palardy Roger feels the majority of women in these institutions to some extent “feel like impostors."

The ACWC is currently planning its own festival of concert music by (mostly) Canadian women composers in Ottawa next fall, to celebrate its 20th anniversary. But in the meantime, SuperMicMac promises to be a roof-shaking celebration of women who’ve beaten the odds.

De l’OSM aux Djettes, on fait toute la place à la musique au féminin

Alain Brunet, La Presse, October 8, 2000

En vieux français, on disait mique maque, un terme d’origine néerlandaise qui signifiait rebelle. En nouvelle musique? Mic pour musiciennes innovatrices canadiennes, Mac pour musiques actuelles et contemporaines. Présenté du 25 octobre au 12 novembre, le SuperMicMac sera actuel et improvisé, électro, contemporain, hybride, tournedisque et DJettes. Le SuperMicMac sera aussi exposé et raconté.

Dévoilée cette semaine, la programmation de cet événement unique a été érigée sous la direction artistique de la percussionniste, compositrice et improvisatrice Danielle Palardy Roger, associée aux productions Super Mémé.

«Dans la foulée des fêtes du millénaire, explique-t-elle, nous avons voulu vraiment créer un événement qui recoupait les musiques contemporaines, les musiques écrites, les musiques électro, actuelles, improvisées, un peu le jazz, I’électronica, les Djettes, la nouvelle lutherie, la performance. Ce que je voulais en faire au-delà d’un rassemblement de musiciennes, c’était un rassemblement de musique.»

«Ce vaste projet, fait-elle remarquer en outre, met en lumière un siècle de création au féminin. Bien sûr, les 25 demières années de musique de création se trouvent majoritaires dans cette programmation. On présente tout de même une exposition qui vise à dresser le portrait des pionnières d’hier à aujourd’hui. Également, une conférence abordera la question des femmes et du jazz depuis les années 50, une autre sera consacrée aux pionnières des années 50 jusqu’à aujourd’hui.»

Aucune tendance de la musique nouvelle n’a été laissée pour compte, assure-t-on au SuperMicMac; Danielle Palardy Roger a fait appel à d’autres intervenants afin de mettre sur pied une programmation éclectique et d’ainsi éviter tout sectarisme. «J’ai consulté toutes les personnes et organismes compétents à ce titre. Même l’OSM a embarqué! Mon travail en a été un de coordination de façon à ce qu’il n’y ait pas de recoupements», dit-elle.

Des muses en musique

Marc Chénard, La Scena Musicale, no. 6:2, October 1, 2000

Peu aprés l’arrivée du nouveau millénaire, la scène musicale canadienne perdit, coup sur coup, trois de ses plus remarquables personnalités: Violet Archer, Barbara Pentland et Jean Coulthard. Eussent-elles été cantatrices ou pianistes, leurs disparitions auraient sans doute suscité bien plus d’attention médiatique que la plupart des notices nécrologiques lapidaires publiées. Cependant, elles avaient choisi de poursuivre le métier de compositrice, œuvrant dans l’ombre de leurs collègues masculins au cours de leurs trés longues carrières d’artistes et de pédagogues émérites.

Lorsque l’on considère l’histoire de la musique sous l’angle de la création, force est de constater la prédominance des hommes au chapitre de la composition. Devant cet état de fait, la musicienne québécoise Danielle Palardy Roger s’est justement interrogée. «Comme la musique a toujours été liée aux mathématiques, déclare-t-elle d’emblee, elle a été perçue comme science pendant des siècles et tout ce côté pensé ou structuré des choses semble relever du monde des hommes, du moins traditionnellement. En revanche, des arts comme le théâtre ou la danse sont considérés comme plus proches des émotions, donc plus connectés à l’âme dite féminine.»

Impliquée sur la scène des musiques nouvelles ou «actuelles» québécoises depuis quelque 20 ans, Danielle Palardy Roger parle en connaissance de cause. Non seulement œuvret-elle comme batteuse-percussionniste au sein du collectif rallié autour de l’étiquette Ambiances Magnétiques, mais elle est également trés active en tant que promotrice du travail de ses consceurs musiciennes. Membre fondatrice des Productions SuperMémé depuis sa création en 1979, elle était co-organisatrice (avec son associée Diane Labrosse) du premier événement montréalais des musiques au féminin, le Festival international des Musidennes Innovatrices (FIMI), tenu en avril 1988.

Douze ans aprés cette initiative, elle récidive avec un nouvel événement de grande envergure, le SuperMicMac. Étalé sur trois semaines à compter du 25 octobre prochain, cet «événement», comme elle insiste pour l’appeler afin de mieux souligner son caractére unique, est davantage une rétrospective de la partidpation des femmes au développement de la musique canadienne. Au centre de sa programmation, 18 spectacles sont prévus, ceux-ci recoupant les champs des musiques contemporaines et improvisées, mais aussi une série de prestations de musiques ambiantes animéss par des DJettes (eh oui, les DJ au féminin, ça existe). Des musiques «traditionelles» sont également inscrites au programme, en l’occurrence une performance de chants de gorge données par deux femmes inuites. Et un certain passé folklorique sera aussi au rendez-vous à l’occasion d’un hommage tout spécial à la Bolduc, mettant en vedene un septuor pancanadien comprenant la clarinettiste manitobaine Lori Freedman, et les torontoises Marilyn Lerner et Lee Pui Ming. Comme l’explique l’organisatrice, «ce spectacle c’est un peu comme remettre les lettres de noblesse à la Bolduc, parce qu’elle était une des premières femmes à écrire et à dévelpper la chanson. «Pour monter ce spectacle, Danielle P. Rogé a choisi quelques-unes des chansons de cette légende de la musique quebécoise et a confié à chacune de ses consœurs la tâche d’arranger un morceau de son choix.

Parmi les autres ensembles participants, I’OSM sera aussi de la partie et il lancera du même coup sa nouvelle série intitulée L’OSM, au présent, cette première sous la direction de la chef attitré du Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Lorraine Vaillancourt. Par ailleurs, les compositrices d’électroacoustique seront aussi à l’honneur à deux reprises et des solistes de premier plan telles vivie’ vincent (alias Vivian Spiteri, clavecin ), Estelle Lemire (ondes Martenot) et Rivka Golani (alto) se produiront. A signaler aussi, en complément de programme: deux conférences traitant respectivement des innavatrions dans le jazz et de l’histoire des femmes musiciennes dans le milieu montréaIais, une table ronde et une exposition iconographique (photos, partitions) en montre dans le corridor des Pas perdus de la Place des Arts.

«En tout et partout, il y aura quelque 70 participantes à l’événement, nous précise l’organisatrice, ou prés d’une centaine si l’on inclut toutes les compositrices (canadiennes et internationales) inscrites aux différents programmes.» Mais par-delà ces données spécifiques, I’événement est une célébration de la contribution des femmes à la création musicale. Même si Danielle Palardy Roger croit qu’elles n’ont pas reçu leur, leur dû a ce titre, pour elle le problème ne peut ètre atribué à un quelconque dessein d’exclusion, mais à un certain manque de profil ou de représentativité des femmes au sein de la grande communauté musicale. «On ne peut pas nier le fait qu’il y a une culture féminine et une façon d’approcher les choses qui soit différente des hommes, et ce, peu importe le métier. Mais de là à parler d’une créativité féminine, distincte de celle des hommes, je ne le pense pas. Qu’on soit homme ou femme, ça ne fait pas grand différence, au fond, parce que la musique reste la musique.»